10 Foods High In Zinc

Did you know that getting enough zinc in your diet can help you have a stronger immune system and heal wounds faster? Zinc is a vital mineral for optimum health. 1It’s a key component in the catalytic activity of over 300 enzymes and the proper functioning of the immune system— the creation of genetic materials and cell integration. It is involved in cell division, cell development, and carbohydrate breakdown.

Importance of Zinc in Present Time

As a result of the global pandemic of COVID-19, researchers are looking for ways to prevent and treat SARS-CoV-2. People with chronic diseases and the elderly at risk of zinc deficiency tend to be at higher risk of infection and adverse outcomes. By several mechanisms, zinc may prevent the emergence of symptoms, reduce their intensity, and shorten their duration.

Here Are 10 of the Best Foods That Are High Zinc

1. Beef

Zinc per 3 ounces

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

7 mg

65% DV

4.8 mg

44% DV

12 mg

105% DV

2Meat is a good source of zinc. Red meat is an excellent source, but enough of it may be found in other types of meat as well such as lamb and pork.

3In fact, a 100-gram (3.5-ounce) portion of raw ground beef provides 4.8 milligrams of zinc or 44 per cent of the Daily Value (DV) for the mineral.

176 calories, 20 grams of protein, and 10 grams of fat are also provided by this amount of meat. It also contains a lot of other critical minerals like creatine, vitamin B, and iron.

4It’s worth mentioning that consuming high amount of red meat, mainly processed meat, has been related to a higher risk of heart disease and some malignancies but as long as you limit your intake of processed meats and take unprocessed red meats as a portion of a diet rich in fibre, vegetables, and fruits, this is unlikely to be a problem.

2. Shellfish

Zinc per 6 oysters

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

32 mg

291% DV

61 mg

555% DV

155 mg

1405% DV

Shellfish are a low-calorie, high-zinc food. Oysters provide the highest concentration of zinc from any food source, with six medium oysters giving 32 mg or 291 per cent of the daily value.

Other shellfish, like shrimp, crayfish, and crab have a lower zinc content than oysters, although they are still good sources.

5Alaskan crab contains 7.6 mg per 100 grams (3.5 ounces), or 69 per cent of the daily value. Shrimp and mussels, which yield 14 per cent of the DV per 100 grams, are also good sources (3.5 ounces).

If you’re pregnant, though, make certain shellfish is properly cooked before eating it to avoid getting food poisoning.

3. Legumes

Zinc per cup

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

3 mg

23% DV

1 mg

12% DV

2 mg

20% DV

Zinc is found in abundance in legumes such as beans, lentils, and chickpeas. 6Around 100 grams of cooked lentils provide about 12% of the daily value.

7They do contain phytates. These anti-nutrients prevent zinc and other minerals from being absorbed. Therefore zinc from legumes isn’t as well absorbed as zinc from animal sources.

Despite this, they can be a good source of zinc for those who eat a vegan or vegetarian diet. Legumes are also high in fibre and protein, and they’re simple to include in salads, stews, and soups.

Plant sources of zinc, such as legumes, can be made more bioavailable by fermenting, soaking, sprouting, or heating.

4. Seeds

Zinc per Oz

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

3 mg

26% DV

10 mg

90% DV

4 mg

33% DV

8Seeds are a nutritious addition to your diet that can help you get more zinc. Sesame seeds, pumpkin, and squash seeds are some of the other seeds high in zinc.

Three tablespoons (30 grams) of hemp seeds provide 31% and 43% of the required daily consumption for men and women, respectively.

Seeds are a fantastic addition to your diet because they contain vitamins, fibre, minerals, and healthy fats in addition to zinc.

They’ve also been linked to several health benefits, including lower blood pressure and cholesterol when consumed as part of a healthy diet.

Salads, soups, yoghurts, and other meals can all be used to incorporate hemp, flax, pumpkin, or squash seeds into your diet.

5. Nuts


Zinc intake can be increased by eating almonds, cashews, peanuts, and pine nuts. Nuts also contain other beneficial elements, such as healthy fats and fibre and multiple vitamins and minerals.

Zinc per 1 Oz handful

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

2 mg

15% DV

6 mg

59% DV

2 mg

17% DV

9Cashews are an excellent choice if you’re seeking a zinc-rich nut. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving provides 15% of the daily value.

Nuts are also a quick and easy snack, and they’ve been linked to a lower risk of ailments, including diabetes, cancer, and heart disease.

6. Dairy

Zinc per cup

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

4.8 mg

44% DV

3.6 mg

33% DV

1.8 mg

16% DV

Milk and cheese provide a variety of minerals, including zinc.

10Milk and cheese are two significant sources of bioavailable zinc, which means that your body can absorb most of the zinc in these foods.

One hundred grams of cheddar cheese has roughly 33% of the daily requirement, whereas a single cup of full-fat milk contains about 9%.

These foods also contain other nutrients beneficial to bone health, such as vitamin D, calcium, and protein.

7. Eggs

Zinc per large egg

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

0.6 mg

5% DV

1.3 mg

12% DV

1.8 mg

16% DV

11Eggs are a good source of zinc and can help you achieve your daily requirements. One large egg contains around 5% of the daily value.

That contains 77 calories, 6 grams of protein, 5 grams of healthy fats, and a variety of minerals and vitamins, including selenium and vitamin B. Whole eggs are also a good source of choline, a vitamin that most people are deficient in.

8. Whole Grains

Zinc per cup quinoa

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

2 mg

18% DV

1.1 mg

10% DV

1.8 mg

17% DV

12Zinc is found in whole grains such as oats, rice, quinoa, and wheat. Grains, like legumes, contain phytates, which bind to zinc and prevent it from being absorbed.

Whole grains have higher phytates than refined grains, which means they will give less zinc.

They are still far healthier for your health and contain multiple crucial nutrients such as selenium, manganese, fibre, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin B, and iron.

Consuming whole grains has been linked to a longer lifespan and various other health benefits, such as a lower risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.

9. Some Vegetables

Zinc per Oz

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

0.1 mg

1% DV

0.3 mg

3% DV

0.7 mg

6% DV

Vegetables and fruits, in general, are low in zinc. Some veggies contain sufficient zinc to help you meet your daily requirements, especially if you don’t consume meat.

13Potatoes, including ordinary and sweet types, contain about 1 mg per large potato, or about 9% of the daily requirement.

Kale and green beans contain only about 3% of the daily value per 100 grams.

10. Dark Chocolate

Zinc per Oz

Zinc per 100 grams

Zinc per 200 calories

2.8 mg

5% DV

3.3 mg

30% DV

3 mg

3% DV

You might be surprised to know that dark chocolate is an excellent source of zinc.

14A 100-gram (3.5-ounce) bar of 70%–85% dark chocolate contains 3.3 milligrams of zinc or 30% of the daily value.

Dark chocolate has 600 calories per 100 grams. As a result, while it contains certain beneficial elements, it is a high-calorie diet.

While your treat may provide some additional nutrients, it is not a food you should rely on as your primary supply of zinc!!

Bottom Line

Zinc is an essential mineral that must be consumed in sufficient amounts to sustain optimum health.

The best method to acquire enough zinc is to consume a diversified diet rich in zinc-rich foods such as meat, fish, nuts, seeds, legumes, and dairy. These foods are easy to incorporate into your diet and are delicious.

If you’re concerned that you’re not absorbing enough zinc from your diet, talk to your doctor about taking supplements.

References

  1.  Prasad, A. S. (2013). Discovery of Human Zinc Deficiency: Its Impact on Human Health and Disease. Advances in Nutrition, 4(2), 176–190. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.112.003210
  2.  Beef, ground, 90% lean meat / 10% fat, raw [hamburger] Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. Retrieved November 5, 2021, from https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2
  3.  Beef, ground, 90% lean meat / 10% fat, raw [hamburger] Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2
  4. A, W. (2017, February 1). Potential Health Hazards of Eating Red Meat. Journal of Internal Medicine. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27597529/
  5.  Crustaceans, crab, alaska king, cooked, moist heat Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. Retrieved November 5, 2021, from https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4160/2
  6.  Lentils, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4338/2
  7.  Sandberg, A.-S. (2002). Bioavailability of minerals in legumes. British Journal of Nutrition, 88(S3), 281–285. https://doi.org/10.1079/bjn/2002718
  8.  Seeds, pumpkin and squash seeds, whole, roasted, without salt Nutrition Facts & Calories. (2018). Self.com. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3141/2
  9.  Nuts, cashew nuts, raw Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. Retrieved November 5, 2021, from https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3095/2
  10.  Roohani, N., Hurrell, R., Kelishadi, R., & Schulin, R. (2013). Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review. Journal of Research in Medical Sciences : The Official Journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 18(2), 144–157. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3724376/
  11.  Egg, whole, cooked, hard-boiled Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. Retrieved November 5, 2021, from https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/117/2
  12.  Gupta, R. K., Gangoliya, S. S., & Singh, N. K. (2013). Reduction of phytic acid and enhancement of bioavailable micronutrients in food grains. Journal of Food Science and Technology, 52(2), 676–684. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-013-0978-y
  13.  Sweet potato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt [Sweetpotato] Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2667/2
  14.  Candies, chocolate, dark, 70-85% cacao solids Nutrition Facts & Calories. (n.d.). Nutritiondata.self.com. https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/sweets/10638/2

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sign Up & Receive my FREE ebook